Sec. 5 . (a) Upon a showing of good cause, the state or the defendant may be granted an alteration or revocation of bail by application to the court before which the proceeding is pending.  In reviewing a motion for alteration or revocation of bail, credible hearsay evidence is admissible to establish good cause.

(b) When the state presents additional:

(1) evidence relevant to a high risk of nonappearance, based on the factors set forth in section 4(b) of this chapter;  or

(2) clear and convincing evidence:

(A) of the factors described in IC 35-40-6-6(1)(A) and IC 35-40-6-6(1)(B) ;  or

(B) that the defendant otherwise poses a risk to the physical safety of another person or the community;

the court may increase bail.  If the additional evidence presented by the state is DNA evidence tending to show that the defendant committed additional crimes that were not considered at the time the defendant was admitted to bail, the court may increase or revoke bail.

(c) When the defendant presents additional evidence of substantial mitigating factors, based on the factors set forth in section 4(b) of this chapter, which reasonably suggests that the defendant recognizes the court’s authority to bring the defendant to trial, the court may reduce bail.  However, the court may not reduce bail if the court finds by clear and convincing evidence that the factors described in IC 35-40-6-6(1)(A) and IC 35-40-6-6(1)(B) exist or that the defendant otherwise poses a risk to the physical safety of another person or the community.

(d) The court may revoke bail or an order for release on personal recognizance upon clear and convincing proof by the state that:

(1) while admitted to bail the defendant:

(A) or the defendant’s agent threatened or intimidated a victim, prospective witnesses, or jurors concerning the pending criminal proceeding or any other matter;

(B) or the defendant’s agent attempted to conceal or destroy evidence relating to the pending criminal proceeding;

(C) violated any condition of the defendant’s current release order;

(D) failed to appear before the court as ordered at any critical stage of the proceedings;  or

(E) committed a felony or a Class A misdemeanor that demonstrates instability and a disdain for the court’s authority to bring the defendant to trial;

(2) the factors described in IC 35-40-6-6(1)(A) and IC 35-40-6-6(1)(B) exist or that the defendant otherwise poses a risk to the physical safety of another person or the community;  or

(3) a combination of the factors described in subdivisions (1) and (2) exists.